Burnley Crop Share

Veg Scheme - Burnley, Lancashire
Burnley Crop Share

Delicious, sustainable food that doesn’t cost the earth

Burnley Crop share is run by Burnley Food Links – a community enterprise working to develop a sense of community and food security through the provision of local food in the area around Burnley in East Lancashire.

We are a not for profit company set up in 2004 to get people involved in developing a sustainable food system by raising awareness of the benefits of a strong local food economy for people and the environment.  We are committed to the sustainable, local production of good food. We want people to be able to get hold of this food easily and in the certain knowledge that they are buying into a scheme that is based on principles, not profit.

  • We are a social enterprise – all profits are re-invested to support the production of sustainable food locally.
  • We have strong links with all our growers, and we pay a fair price for their produce.
  • We aim to make sustainably grown fruit and veg affordable for all.

The food in our bags (in fact they are bags, not boxes!) is either certified organic or grown without pesticides and chemicals.

We welcome people of all ages, cultures and backgrounds who are interested in growing, cooking, buying, selling, sharing or eating local and organic food. 

Burnley Crop Share – why we’re a BFT

The food is sourced from growers that use the Climate Friendly Food guidelines and/or organically certified suppliers and we prioritise local growers when we order for the bags.

Our prime objective is to find ways to increase local vegetable and fruit production using low input horticultural practices in order to build local resilience in the face of peak oil and the need to reduce CO2 emissions.

We focus on buying from small-scale urban and peri-urban growers and only supplement with produce from larger producers and wholesalers when absolutely necessary. We pay the fair price that our growers need in order to achieve a sustainable livelihood and attempt to share the risk of bad harvests or weather events by being flexible and responsive in our purchasing practices.

As scheme grows, we will identify, set up and invest in more small scale growing operations.

We inform participants in our scheme of our principles and practice through newsletters and communal events.  We try hard to create new opportunities for volunteering and to be inclusive.

Our urban growing site is a centre for horticultural training for people with special needs.

We’re working towards being able to offer discounted bags through credit unions for people low income.

We’re passionate about changing the food system to a more localised and sustainable model.

As we’re learning more about ‘what works’, we continue to inform our customers – and potential customers! – about our successes (and failures).  We continually work to raise the profile of our efforts and achievements through local and national media and through networking with other organisations.

Socials